For the Birds Radio Program: April is the cruelest month

Original Air Date: April 12, 2004

April is most cruel for lonely souls, in the face of all the pairings and romantic songs and surging new life all around. Perhaps we must feel a part of nature, rather than bitter onlookers, to take joy in the reawakening of song and romance and nesting and new life.

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Transcript

Spring Advancing!

T.S. Eliot began his work, The Wasteland, with the lines, “April is the cruelest month, breeding/ Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing/ Memory and desire, stirring/ Dull roots with spring rain.

For many of us, the cruelty of April stems from the month’s inconstancy and unpredictability, as temperatures, winds, and dreams of balmy days ahead fluctuate wildly. But even in the face of an April blizzard, hope is astir in the land. Dull roots are indeed stirred with spring rain and melting snows, and our memories of years past and our desires for new growth and rebirth seem to me to be more hopeful and happy in April than in the other month of wild unpredictability, November. To the undiscerning eye, the woods look pretty similar on a November day and an early April day, the trees leafless, the dead leaves brown and still. But those bare branches are bulging with buds, and even as snow piles remain in the low spots, frogs trill, robins and juncos sing, and woodpeckers drum. Our own blood seems to flow more freely as maple sap flows.

We await leaf-out and flower blooms and hummingbirds and orioles, but signs of spring are already abundant. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers quietly but earnestly prepare the way for later migrants, digging out little wells in the tree bark where the rich sap will provide nourishment for hummingbirds, kinglets, warblers, and phoebes. The first bluebirds and swallows are inspecting our bird houses. Sandhill Cranes have arrived, some females already on eggs, their gray and brown backs blending in with dead vegetation and bare soil. Female robins are arriving, inspecting our eaves and spruce branches, and eyeing us hopefully as we dig in our gardens, wondering whether we’ll toss out a night crawler or two. Our feeders are jeopardized by bears, hungry after a long winter’s sleep, impatient and unwilling to wait for Nature to fix them some breakfast when suet and seeds are set out so invitingly.

April is the month of huge hawk movements, when kestrels suddenly reappear on telephone wires and red-tails and eagles circle overhead. It’s hard to pull our eyes away from them to scrutinize the spruce branches, but when we do, tiny golden-crowned kinglets reward the effort. These endearing little sprites are so busy and active that they’re hard to hold in view for more than seconds. Is it their endless energy that makes them so endearing? Barely bigger than hummingbirds, these tiniest of all songbirds do check us out when we whistle or go “psshhhhhhh, psshhhhhhhh, psshhhhhhhh!,” though they’re so quick that we may miss them if we aren’t focused and fast.

As the sun rises on an April morning, the air is filled with song—robins, fox sparrows, juncos. Chickadees whistle their “Hey, sweetie!” song over and over and over, the urgency of romance almost palpable. We humans think of June as the month for weddings, but many birds, from cranes and eagles to robins and chickadees, consummate their love in April.

Is April truly the cruelest month? Perhaps it is for those who plant their gardens a bit too early, or for those who yearn for picnics and swimming and summer heat. But I suspect April is most cruel of all for lonely souls, in the face of all the pairings and romantic songs and surging new life all around. Perhaps we must feel a part of nature, rather than bitter onlookers, to take joy in the reawakening of song and romance and nesting and new life. When we stir memory and desire, we can be saddened, like T.S. Eliot, or we can choose to be soothed like Rachel Carson, who found “something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature–the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter.”